Welcome to the Centre for English, Translation, and Anglo-Portuguese Studies.

CETAPS is a research centre that brings together people from 11 Portuguese institutions of higher education, promoting research and activities with high national and international reach.

Evaluation Panel: ARTS AND HUMANITIES – Literary Studies
FCT 2013-2017 Evaluation (current): Overall Quality Grade: EXCELLENT

Recent publications from CETAPS members

How Do We Laugh about This? Literary Satire in Trump Times by Teresa Botelho 

In his 1995 text Fables of Subversion, Steven Weisenburger draws a useful distinction between two types of satirical modes: on the one hand, traditional or generative, whose choice of a target is independent of the text itself and that, deriving its meaning from specific contexts, assumes a corrective gesture outward that is dependent on implied normative consensual codes; on the other, degenerative satire, which can be seen as more radically oppositional, interrogating and subverting all kinds of codified knowledge, including the text itself, which is exposed as an act of ‘fiction-making’ by frequently using shifting narrative viewpoints, and transtextual interplay with prior texts.In his 1995 text Fables of Subversion, Steven Weisenburger draws a useful distinction between two types of satirical modes: on the one hand, traditional or generative, whose choice of a target is independent of the text itself and that, deriving its meaning from specific contexts, assumes a corrective gesture outward that is dependent on implied normative consensual codes; on the other, degenerative satire, which can be seen as more radically oppositional, interrogating and subverting all kinds of codified knowledge, including the text itself, which is exposed as an act of ‘fiction-making’ by frequently using shifting narrative viewpoints, and transtextual interplay with prior texts.

Literature against Paralysis in Joyce and His Counterparts: The Other Dubliners

Edited by Márcia Lemos

Despite his criticism, in Dubliners and elsewhere, James Joyce wrote of nothing but his “Dear Dirty Dublin” (Ulysses, 1922). UNESCO City of Literature since 2010, Dublin is indeed the birthplace of, or the inspiration for, many literary masters and masterpieces. When readers and scholars around the world celebrate the 100th anniversary of Ulysses, this collection, which brings together essays on the work of selected Irish writers (including Joyce), analyses how Irish literature disrupts both paralysis and entropy, making sense of our human “chaosmos” (Finnegans Wake, 1939) by juxtaposing local and universal concerns.

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“The result of a long journey I had the pleasure to take along with co-editors Peter Marks, from the University of Sydney, and Jennifer Wagner-Lawlor, from Penn State University, the PALGRAVE HANDBOOK OF UTOPIAN AND DYSTOPIAN LITERATURES was presented […], at the Utopian Studies Conference, in Brighton. Many thanks to all the contributors to the volume!”
Fátima Vieira

Teaching Post-Black Aesthetics and the Coming-of-Age Novels of Danzy Senna and Colson Whitehead in Portugal: Reconsidering the Gap

by Teresa Botelho

This chapter examines the challenges of, and opportunities for, teaching African-American fiction in the academic environment in Portugal, a country where colonial domination ended only in the mid-1970s after an anti-independence war fought for thirteen years in Africa. Interest among all Portuguese in their nation’s recent past, as well as the presence of numerous Afro-Portuguese citizens in the country, has made studying African-American authors especially relevant. These writers are seen as not only speaking to the American present state of race relations but, in many ways, creating a bridge to the contemporary experiences and interrogations of Portuguese students.

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